The Four Seals of Buddhism: A Talk With Rigdzin Tingkhye hosted by Isla Ross

Saturday, November 4 (7-9pm) at Interfaith Community Sanctuary

1763 NW 62nd St Seattle, WA 98107

 

1. All compounded things are impermanent… There is the vivid reality that our life comes and goes, being transitory in nature.

2. All stained states are pain… Our deluded and mistaken views constantly cause us suffering.

3. All phenomena are without inherent existence… Shunyata - emptiness... Things lack inherent existence and our problem is we hold onto permanent “Concrete” notions that are without reason.

4. Nirvana is beyond description… Through practice we develop a clarity that is the experience of Being beyond extremes and words which is the union of wisdom and compassion (emptiness and clarity).

“Buddhism” is uniquely supported and practiced with and by valid cognitive reason, not blind faith. This is known as the “Profound View” and characteristic. Because of this, our "liberation in the Palm of your hand'. It’s always within our reach. It’s not someone or some outward power is going to give us liberation and fully freedom. Buddha’s primary teaching is that our freedom is our responsibility and he offers his experience and practices of the path which provide us with this same exact opportunity. As Buddha himself said..." You are the Master of your own self." Everything depends on oneself. This is the true freedom.

Every one is welcome. 

Tashidelek,

Rigdzin

The Many Jewels

Living Sensual Studio - north Capitol Hill (Seattle, WA)

Description (written by Piper Lauri)

Tantric Buddhism is filled with glorious descriptions of the beauty of Life bestowed upon the loving heart: lotus flowers in pinks, blues, yellows and reds, scents of the Divine, rubies, emeralds, diamonds, glorious, delicious foods plentiful to the tongue and mind.  This bounty of Life is a continual gift to be received and shared with others.  This bounty of Life stems from the compassionate and trusting heart.  Come learn more and enjoy the grace of Rigdzin's presence and teachings in this week's Heart Sangha.

A calm and compassionate, beautiful, knowledgeable and wise man, Rigdzin has touched many in the Seattle area over his 25 years here. With a rich understanding and life lead through the tenets of Tantric Buddhism, his heart and his mind are one in the same, and his presence is pure sweetness. I am so fortunate to call him my teacher.

*Rigdzin has added a joyous and power ritual to our event this evening, Nishu Ghu. Nishu Ghu is the Buddhist ritual of Cleaning and Purification for the Tibetan lunar New Year. We will begin our evening with a celebration of the last day of the month before the new year begins tomorrow, "Burning out the remains of past years and Proclaiming the opportunities and the light of the coming years."

Pick up a Limitless Life sticker!

We love the reception our new sticker has been getting!  Designed by Pauline Yu in Berkeley, CA and printed in the United States with UV ink (longer lasting and better quality than UV-coating), the stickers are currently available only at Pema Kharpo in Seattle, WA.  Thanks, and love!

Getting along with Buddha's mind: An evening of reflection and storytelling

Vashon Intuitive Arts - 17331 Vashon Highway SW, Vashon, WA.

Donations are welcome.  Please call (206) 463-0025 with any questions.

This spacious luminosity of mind is always present.  It never expires or unwinds, it never depreciates.

There is nothing to add or subtract--we simply need to learn how to get along with it, make friends with this nature of mind.  All encompassing wisdom and compassion illuminates from this Buddha mind, our ultimate mind.

We have temporarily obscured it with our attachment to all kinds of name and fame, pain and pleasure, and everyday habits of holding things as permanent.  Fortunately these mistaken views are also impermanent.

We can walk along with Buddha's mind and build a new path,and establish an everyday practice of walking with Buddha, reconciling with Buddha's mind.


Know yourself, love yourself: Practices to train the mind

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Please join Rigdzin for this special lecture offering by Sakya Monastery's Virupa Educational Institute.   All are welcome regardless of ability to donate (there is a requested donation of $20, for Monastery members $15)

Sakya Monastery Cultural Hall - 108 NW 83rd St Seattle, WA 98117

No outer enemy can take us to a hell realm; only our own ego, pride, jealousy, and anger can take us to such places. If we have a difficult supervisor or neighbor, we can change jobs or move out. The other enemy that always comes with us, sleeps with us, eats with us, even when we are happy they are right there with us -- that enemy is the most dangerous. Whether we are an agent or recipient of these unstable and powerful afflictions, their capacity for dealing out destruction and suffering is overwhelming.

Using the Tibetan Buddhist teaching Eight Verses of Training the Mind as a guide, we will discuss how to identify and locate the sources and effects of these harmful states. Rather than seeking to shut down or expel these energies, we will learn instead how to foster a mindful practice of becoming intimate with our inner enemies (the giving and receiving technique of tonglen will also be discussed). This practice will include the cultivation of loving-kindness and wisdom to support the health and balance of the most neglected parts of ourselves.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has described the Eight Verses of Training the Mind as the concentrated expression of the entire essence of Buddhist teachings. Each talk in this series will cover a different portion of the eight verses, while maintaining a broader outlook of the breadth and depth of the verses altogether.

 

Dharma Talks Series: Reclaiming Our Love, part 2 (at East West Bookshop)

Please join Rigdzin as he leads East West Bookshop's Dharma Talk Series, in "Reclaiming Our Love: Eight Verses of Transforming the Mind."

The event has an entrance fee of $10, pre-registration is welcome.  Please visit the link below to sign up for the talk.         East West Bookshop - 6500 Roosevelt Way NE Seattle WA 98105.

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No outer enemy can take us to a hell realm; only our own ego, pride, jealousy, and anger can take us to such places. If we have a difficult supervisor or neighbor, we can change jobs or move out. The other enemy that always comes with us, sleeps with us, eats with us, even when we are happy they are right there with us -- that enemy is the most dangerous. Whether we are an agent or recipient of these unstable and powerful afflictions, their capacity for dealing out destruction and suffering is overwhelming.

Using the Tibetan Buddhist teaching Eight Verses of Training the Mind as a guide, we will discuss how to identify and locate the sources and effects of these harmful states. Rather than seeking to shut down or expel these energies, we will learn instead how to foster a mindful practice of becoming intimate with our inner enemies (the giving and receiving technique of tonglen will also be discussed). This practice will include the cultivation of loving-kindness and wisdom to support the health and balance of the most neglected parts of ourselves.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has described the Eight Verses of Training the Mind as the concentrated expression of the entire essence of Buddhist teachings. Each talk in this series will cover a different portion of the eight verses, while maintaining a broader outlook of the breadth and depth of the verses altogether.

Nothing under the bridge: Learning to love through emptiness

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 A person is not earth, nor water,

Not fire, nor wind, nor space.

Neither are they consciousness, nor all of them;

Yet apart from these, what person is there?

-"The Precious Garland of Advice"

Dwelling in a cocoon of ‘my friend,’ ‘my child,’ ‘my enemy,’ we shield ourselves from the truth of emptiness.  Yet becoming intimate with emptiness is the only way to truly realize the interdependency of all things and reach ultimate, unbiased love.

Taking this verse by 2nd century Indian philosopher Nagarjuna as inspiration, we will accept his invitation to look deeply into the freedom within ourselves, and in so doing awaken to the never-expiring luminosity of the world.

 

Dharma Talks Series: Reclaiming Our Love, part 1 (at East West Bookshop)

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Please join Rigdzin as he leads East West Bookshop's Dharma Talk Series, in "Reclaiming Our Love: Eight Verses of Transforming the Mind."                                

East West Bookshop - 6500 Roosevelt Way NE Seattle WA 98105.

No outer enemy can take us to a hell realm; only our own ego, pride, jealousy, and anger can take us to such places. If we have a difficult supervisor or neighbor, we can change jobs or move out. The other enemy that always comes with us, sleeps with us, eats with us, even when we are happy they are right there with us -- that enemy is the most dangerous. Whether we are an agent or recipient of these unstable and powerful afflictions, their capacity for dealing out destruction and suffering is overwhelming.

Using the Tibetan Buddhist teaching Eight Verses of Training the Mind as a guide, we will discuss how to identify and locate the sources and effects of these harmful states. Rather than seeking to shut down or expel these energies, we will learn instead how to foster a mindful practice of becoming intimate with our inner enemies (the giving and receiving technique of tonglen will also be discussed). This practice will include the cultivation of loving-kindness and wisdom to support the health and balance of the most neglected parts of ourselves.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama has described the Eight Verses of Training the Mind as the concentrated expression of the entire essence of Buddhist teachings. Each talk in this series will cover a different portion of the eight verses, while maintaining a broader outlook of the breadth and depth of the verses altogether.

 

The Radiant Possibilities of Mindfulness at Sakya Monastery of Tibetan Buddhism

Please join Rigdzin for this special lecture offering by Sakya Monastery's Virupa Educational Institute.   Everyone is welcome regardless of ability to donate (there is a requested donation of $20, for Monastery members $15)

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Sakya Monastery Cultural Hall - 108 NW 83rd St Seattle, WA 98117 

(August 30 7-9pm)

The aim of mindfulness is to build harmonious relations with our inner and outer worlds. Mindfulness is to be in the present moment, to be at ease and at peace with oneself. When our mind is disturbed, so will our body, speech and activities be distorted. Practicing mindfulness means to step into a primordial space that is always already there. It does not require any additional struggle or enhancement, nor does anything need to be taken away. This practice is different from the everyday meanings and traits we might associate it with, such as skillful manipulation of the truth, over-attentiveness to detail, or an insatiable urge for knowledge. 

This is not the kind of mindfulness we are interested in. Instead, we are seeking genuine peace within ourselves; a kind of effortless love and compassion that infuses our own being as well as radiates to all living beings. Like the sun which is always shining but whose rays are only visible to us when the clouds subside, we too have the ability to recognize the already present primordial nature of our minds. And just like the penetration of the sun’s heat, whose warmth naturally causes all forms of life to grow and thrive, the understanding of our own minds leads to true qualities of equanimity – selflessness, dignity, and fearlessness. 

 

Translating for Lama Wangdu Rinpoche

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Seattle On July 20-21 2013, Rinpoche will give the empowerment for Jigme Lingpa's Bellowing Laugh of the Dakinis Chod, along with teachings on the practice and ritual instruments. On Sunday, Rinpoche has also offered to conduct the Refuge Ceremony before the Chod practice session.

In addition to receiving permission to practice Chod, retreatants will receive a copy of the text, Bellowing Laugh of the Dakinis, learn the Chod practice melodies sung by Chodpas since the time of Padampa Sangye and Machik Labdron, and receive instruction in the use of the ritual instruments.

Click here to view schedule and register for events.

Biography of Lama Wangdu. 

Antidotes to Anger and dis-Harmonious Living: A talk on the 8 Verses of Training the Mind

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No outer enemy can take us to a hell realm; only our own ego, pride, jealousy, and anger can take us to such places.  If we have a difficult supervisor or neighbor, we can change jobs or move out.  The other enemy that always comes with us, sleeps with us, eats with us, even when we are happy they are right there with us — that enemy is the most dangerous.  Anger is one of the most unstable and powerful of these afflictions.  Whether we are its agent or recipient, its capacity for dealing out destruction and suffering is overwhelming.

Using the Tibetan Buddhist teaching Eight Verses of Training the Mind as a guide, we will discuss how to identify and locate the sources and effects of anger.  Rather than seeking to shut down or expel anger, we will learn instead how to foster a mindful practice of becoming intimate with anger.  The giving and receiving breath technique of tonglen will also be discussed.  This practice will include the cultivation of loving-kindness and wisdom to support the health and balance of the most neglected parts of ourselves.

“Anger comes quickly, and is available any time you want it.  It is patience that is difficult.”

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The Radiant Possibilities of Mindfulness: An evening of discussion and storytelling

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Wahe Guru Yoga - 7415 Greenwood Ave N           Seattle WA 98103 (20 April 2012, 6-8pm)

The aim of mindfulness is to build harmonious relations with our inner and outer worlds.  Mindfulness is to be in the present moment, to be at ease and at peace with oneself. When our mind is disturbed, so will our body, speech and activities be distorted.  Practicing mindfulness means to step into a primordial space that is always already there.  It does not require any additional struggle or enhancement, nor does anything need to be taken away.

This practice is different from the everyday meanings and traits we might associate it with, such as skillful manipulation of the truth, over-attentiveness to detail, or an insatiable urge for knowledge.  This is not the kind of mindfulness we are interested in.  Instead, we are seeking genuine peace within ourselves; a kind of effortless love and compassion that infuses our own being as well as radiates to all living beings.  Like the sun which is always shining but whose rays are only visible to us when the clouds subside, we too have the ability to recognize the already present primordial nature of our minds.  And just like the penetration of the sun’s heat, whose warmth naturally causes all forms of life to grow and thrive, the understanding of our own minds leads to true qualities of equanimity – selflessness, dignity, and fearlessness.

Tibetan Spirituality in Everyday Life

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Private talk at residence of Grant Dermody (Seattle, WA)

"Rigdzin has lived and worked in Seattle for a great many years.  He owns Pema Kharpo, a Tibetan shop, and, as those who are regulars know, a spiritual oasis. Rigdzin has also worked as a translator for several visiting and local Tibetan lamas.  Rigdzin is a devout Buddhist and practices the Dharma in all he does.  He is not a lama, so has an everyday or "householder" view of the Dharma, being both a husband and a father.  He understands the West and Westerners, and is in a unique position to teach Tibetan spirituality. 

Please join us for an excellent afternoon of spiritual growth."

-Grant Dermody

6 January 2012, 5:30-7pm

Transforming Suffering, and other talks by Venerable Palden Gyatso

October 12-18 2005                                                                                                    

Human rights groups are leaving their marks on the world, and an individual or a community motivated to help others will find that world peace will come naturally, a Tibetan monk said during a lecture Tuesday night at the Lawrence Arts Center, 940 N.H.

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Speaking through an interpreter to an audience of more than 100 people, Palden Gyatso described himself as "just a monk" armed with the weapon of truth during a lecture he called "Freedom, Dignity and Justice in the Land of Snows."

Gyatso, who was born in 1933, became a Buddhist monk at the age of 10. He was arrested in 1959 for protesting Chinese occupation of Tibet. He spent the next 33 years in prisons and labor camps where he was often tortured. When he was released, he fled to India in 1992. He said he knew that if he survived that ordeal, he would speak up for his rights.

Gyatso commended the work of human rights groups today and he urged people as individuals and communities to cherish the needs of others over their own. In doing so, their own needs will be taken care of naturally, he said.

Gyatso also urged individuals and communities to exercise anger control.

"Once we accept that we have anger then we can do something about it," he said. "We should not let anger dominate us. If we do, then we become helpless."

Gyatso has been in Lawrence for the past several days conducting lectures and participating in discussions. His appearance was sponsored by the Hall Center for the Humanities at Kansas University and the Lawrence Arts Center's Committee on Imagination & Place.

In 1998, Gyatso was awarded the John Humphrey Freedom Award by the Canadian group Rights & Democracy. The award is named for John Peters Humphrey, a Canadian human rights law professor who prepared the first draft of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Palden Gyatso will appear in four events in the next week in Lawrence, Kansas:

  • “Surviving Three Decades of Political Violence,” lecture followed by book signing, 2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m.  Wednesday, Alderson Auditorium, Kansas Union at the University of Kansas).

  • “Transforming Suffering: Compassion for All,” roundtable discussion, 7 p.m.-9 p.m. Friday, Hall Center for the Humanities, KU.  Panelists will be Gyatso; Felix Moos, professor of anthropology; John Robertson, licensed psychologist; and Kenny Massey, undersheriff for Douglas County.

  • Tibetan crafts sale and book signing, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Zen Zero, 811 Mass.

  • “Freedom, Dignity and Justice in the Land of Snows,” Imagination and Place Lecture, 7 p.m., Lawrence Arts Center, 940 N.H.

Page 14 of Hall Center for the Humanities Annual Report 2005-2006

Palden Gyatso shares vision of peace in Farmington, New Mexico

By Debra Mayeux

FARMINGTON, The Daily Times (Sep 24, 2005) - The Venerable Palden Gyatso travels the world speaking to prime ministers and presidents. He has addressed the United Nations and has spent countless hours with the Dalai Lama.

Gyatso is now in Farmington sharing his story about life in a Chinese prison.  The 74-year-old Tibetan monk was captured when he was 28 years old. He had been a monk for 18 years, having entered the Buddhist monastery when he was 10.  He calls himself "a simple monk," who managed to escape his captors through the workings of Amnesty International.

"It was not that the Chinese voluntarily released me, it was from pressure from Amnesty International," he said during a Friday interview at the Farmington home of Sarah Teofanov. She is sponsoring his visit through the workings of San Juan Peace Net.

Gyatso was released Aug. 25, 1992, and sent back to the Drapung Monastery in Tibet.  What he found was his childhood home in wreckage.  "It was almost destroyed," he said, adding the Chinese were watching his every move. "It was like being captured."

He decided to escape Tibet by fleeing Sept. 8, 1992, to India, where he met the Dalai Lama.  "I finally felt the relief of freedom," Gyatso said.

The Dalai Lama urged Gyatso to write a book about his capture and life in prison. It is titled "The Autobiography of a Tibetan Monk." The book led to invitations from world leaders and changed Gyatso's life.

He was soon sharing a message of peace and forgiveness with some of the most powerful men and women in the world. They were listening and allowing him to tell his story. They were also open to understanding his life's religion, Buddhism.  It was through this religion that he found strength while being captured. He said he concentrated on Buddhist philosophy when he was being tortured beyond belief.

"I relied heavily on refuge, which has the wisdom of antidotes and discourses of how to manage or to create space in an adverse situation," he said.  Gyatso also used the Tong Lan meditation, in which he reversed his situation.  "I would give love, understanding and compassion to the one driven by hatred and revenge," he said, adding that through this he "received their hatred."

Gyatso, who speaks with the assistance of Rigdzin Tingkhye, an English translator, told Tingkhye that the Tong Lan meditation is very difficult and he "mimicked it," while imprisoned.  "We all have a capacity to overcome our hatred," he said.

Gyatso added that anger and hatred are the root of suffering.  "We have to discriminate anger and when we are driven by hatred and anger, we destroy the peace of others and self," he said.

Gyatso is sharing this message with the people of Farmington. Through it, he hopes to develop a conscious goal toward world peace.  "If people can perceive any sort of inspiration or lessons from my life story, that is my hope," he said. "We all have the capacity to overcome anger and hatred." 

First Free Saturday at Seattle Art Museum

Seattle Art Museum - 1300 First Avenue Seattle WA 98101                                                            4 June 2005, 11am-2pm

Prayer Flags are traditionally rooted in Tibetan culture where high over the Himalayan passes you find them fluttering and snapping in the wind that carries the prayer energy away. In the Tibetan mind the very act of raising Prayer Flags is to increase merit, good fortune, and peace, for oneself and all beings, while wishing to conquer negative emotions, disease, famine, and all disasters. In Tibetan society communities gather and ritually raise prayer flags to lift everyone's spirits. Today you are invited to come together to create prayer flags of your own with Rigdzin Tingkhye. 

Rigdzin Tingkhye was born in Tibet and has been hanging prayer flags ever since he can remember. He is involved in the community as a language teacher, and an interpreter for various Tibetan scholars including H.H. Dagchen Rinpoche at Sakya Monastery.